7 Best Life Extension Blood Tests and Companies in 2024

7 Best Life Extension Blood Tests and Companies in 2024

Update 9/25/2023: This post has been updated since we originally published it in February 2021. Several new best life extension blood tests and companies have been added to the main and honorable mentions lists, and one notable company has been replaced (WellnessFX, which was acquired by Thorne). We’ve also gone in and cleaned up anything out-of-date, especially regarding pricing and biomarker numbers.

Note: This is the second article in a two-part series on the best aging biomarkers to track for longevity. While the first article on aging biomarkers discussed 20 specific biomarkers to track, in this post we compare different life extension blood tests and testing companies on the market.

“Easier said than done.”

That’s such a cliché truism isn’t it?

But man is it so true.

It’s one thing to say that spanners who want to safely implement longevity interventions need to measure and track 20 different aging biomarkers to make sure they’re not doing themselves any harm (and to see if those interventions are actually working).

But it’s a whole different thing to actually do all that work yourself; diligently sticking to a testing schedule, manually updating all your numbers in a tracking spreadsheet, and periodically calculating your biological age.

That’s a lot of time, energy, and effort that most people with jobs, families, or even new puppies (we got a Swissy named Kipling; he’s a lot of work but also the sweetest) simply don’t have to spare.

But what if someone else could do all that work for you?

best life extension blood tests 2024

Just like you don’t have to physically make all the items in your house that you use, you also don’t have to do all this longevity testing and tracking yourself.

There are, in fact, quite a few blood testing companies and blood analytics services out there targeted at the longevity market.

And lucky for you I’ve got nothing better to do than take the puppy outside to pee research all of them and narrow down the best ones for spanners to track and measure their own health.

Affiliate Disclaimer: Longevity Advice is reader-supported. When you buy something using links on our site, we may earn a few bucks.

The Best Life Extension Blood Tests and Companies

Because there are literally hundreds of different blood testing companies, labs, and wellness reporting services, I used a few simple criteria to weed out all the basic stuff for normies from the cool, useful stuff relevant to life extension. The below top longevity blood testing companies were included in this list based on the following criteria:

  • Tests specifically for longevity biomarkers that are correlated to aging and are useful for tracking anti-aging interventions.
  • Tests at least 10 different biomarkers.
  • $50 or under per biomarker tested.
  • Available to order in the United States without a separate doctor’s order, or with a doctor’s order included in the price.
  • Pricing visible on the website.
  • Testing doesn’t require having to travel to a different city for most people.
  • After-test analysis and recommendations are provided.

The list is ordered alphabetically by company name.

1. InsideTracker

(Longevity Advice readers get 25% off sitewide with code “WELLZY25”)

longevity blood tests insidetracker

If you’ve been following the life-extension space for a while you’ve probably heard of InsideTracker. That’s likely because famous Harvard researcher and longevity expert Dr. David Sinclair is a small-time investor and advisor in the company and uses them for his own personal blood work. In fact, I think he even mentions the company in Lifespan, his best-selling longevity book.

Founded in 2009, InsideTracker (incorporated as Segterra, Inc.) focuses on blood biomarkers and has a robust reporting and analysis dashboard for customers to track their numbers and compare them against optimal ranges. Recommendations around nutrition, fitness, and lifestyle round out the platform and include things like “take a psyllium supplement” and “add HIT workouts to your routine.” They even include 8,000 different recipes to help implement their diet suggestions.

Recommendations are also rigorously and transparently backed by peer-reviewed science, with links to research papers and explanations of the science behind each recommendation provided in the platform. And InsideTracker does its own science, with a 2018 paper published in Scientific Reports, a Nature imprint, that “shows the statistically significant improvements in biomarkers from initial (baseline) measurement to follow-up measurement, after recommended nutrition interventions were followed by participants.”

InsideTracker’s life extension blood tests are bundled into packages ranging from a “First Responder Panel” measuring just nine biomarkers, to the “Ultimate” plan covering 48 biomarkers. Biomarkers for the Ultimate plan include at least 12 of the 20 mentioned in our best longevity biomarkers piece, plus markers for other minerals and vitamins, and a full blood panel. The “Essentials” package is a little more stingy, covering only 4-5 (depending on how you count them) of the biomarkers we discussed, but with a few additional ones like magnesium levels.

If you plan to do multiple tests (which, if you want to track the efficacy of longevity interventions over time, you probably should), then you can save some money by buying InsideTracker’s test bundles. This includes the $1,388.52 package comprising two Ultimate tests and two “InnerAge” tests, and representing a savings of about $200 over purchasing all four kits individually.

InsideTracker plans include a blood test at any Quest location in the U.S. and Canada, with the option to pay an additional $99 for a mobile blood draw that comes straight to your home. And if you already have blood results from your doctor or another source, and just want the tailored recommendations, InsideTracker has a $119 option where, up to 30 times a year, you can upload your data and be able to track and get recommendations within their dashboard.

Their offerings are rounded out with a blood biomarker-based “InnerAgebiological age test that purports to measure your biological (as opposed to chronological) age similar to Morgan Levine’s phenotypic age calculator (though more expensive and with a proprietary algorithm they haven’t released yet), and a DNA test focused on health-and-wellness biomarkers such as genetic risk for elevated LDL cholesterol (a test which we’ll cover more of in our best DNA tests article).

2. Jinfiniti

(get 10% off with the coupon code “LongevityAdvice”)

anti aging blood tests jinfiniti

Founded in 2018, Jinfiniti, which recently raised $5 million to expand their longevity blood test with new biomarkers, offers four blood test packages currently, not including the unique, “build your own,” option. And, as opposed to other blood test companies that are more aimed at general health and wellness, Jinfiniti is laser-focused on longevity which makes their panels of high interest to spanners.

The basic Jinfiniti test, called “AgingSOS Starter Panel,” covers only 17 biomarkers—including seven from our life-extension biomarkers list—but the additional ones they do cover are both, a) rarely covered by other blood tests and b) highly relevant to cutting-edge theories of aging.

For instance, they measure NAD+ and NADH levels both in your blood and within cells. While there’s some disagreement on the utility of measuring blood NAD+ levels for life extension (cellular and tissue levels of NAD are ideally what you want to measure, so it’s nice intracellular NAD+ levels have been included) it’s nevertheless an interesting data point for some of the things the newest anti-aging research is telling us are important.

Other interesting biomarkers they test for include senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal)—an enzyme that catalyzes certain sugars only in senescent cells. SA-β-gal can thus serve as a biomarker for these types of “zombie” cells—and reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) which are basically the damaging “oxidants” that “antioxidants” remove.

The Jinfiniti AgingSOS Advanced Panel covers six additional biomarkers over the Basic Panel, bringing the total to 23. The new additions include markers for DNA damage, senescent cells, and even sirtuins, which longevity influencer Dr. David Sinclair theorizes may be responsible for cell and DNA repair.

At $798 and $1,198, respectively, these two life extension blood tests are on the higher end for cost in this list, but Jinfiniti does offer some cheaper, though less comprehensive options for spanners wanting a more targeted approach. For example, their test for intracellular NAD+ can be had on its own for only $248, and it can be combined with cellular senescence markers for $598.

The blood tests themselves consist of home collection kits requiring two vials of blood which are then shipped back to Jinfiniti for analysis. Rather than using a third-party lab like Labcorp, Jinfiniti processes their tests in-house.

We’ve also secured a 10% off Jinfiniti coupon for Longevity Advice readers: simply enter the code, “LongevityAdvice” at checkout and it should be applied!

3. Lab Test Analyzer by SelfDecode

longevity blood analytics services lab test analyzer selfdecode
  • Cost: $97 annually (plus the cost of any third-party blood tests)
  • Number of aging biomarkers tracked: 500+
  • Sample/test type: Any other third-party test
  • Privacy and data security: https://selfdecode.com/en/privacy-policy/

We’ve covered biohacker-founded SelfDecode’s offerings before, specifically their DNA genotyping test aimed at spanners and their 3rd party genetic analysis service as well. 

SelfDecode’s Lab Test Analyzer is a little different than the other blood analytics services on this list in that they don’t actually offer blood tests themselves. Instead, you can take the results of your blood tests from any other provider (including just your annual physical at your doctor’s) and upload them to the Lab Test Analyzer website to get more analysis and recommendations.

Rather than per-test pricing, Lab Test Analyzer charges an annual fee of $97 for unlimited access to their back-end and recommendations. This also gets you free access to SelfDecode’s DNA analysis dashboard, in case you’ve taken a DNA test like 23andMe and want to upload the raw data for even more genetic insight.

The biomarkers they analyze number more than 500, and include just about everything from our list of top aging biomarkers (and do cover everything if you include the free added SelfDecode DNA analysis).

Similar to InsideTracker’s research-backed recommendations, Lab Test Analyzer will give you suggestions for diet, lifestyle, and exercise changes based on your inputted lab data. The fact that Lab Test Analyzer doesn’t offer blood tests themselves also means that, unlike most of the other blood test companies listed here, you don’t need to be in the United States to use them, making them a nice option for our international readers.

4. Life Extension

best life extension blood tests

Life Extension has been in the longevity space for almost as long as there’s been a longevity space, and they sell everything from vitamins and supplements, to food, skin creams, and blood tests.

And boy do they offer a ton of blood tests; over 250 by my count. You can choose individual tests a la carte for anywhere from $35 to $144 a test (with most looking like they’re in the $50 range), or go with one of their test packages, like the $299 Male Panel blood test (or the $575 “Elite” version) which includes at least 16 of the 20 aging biomarkers we covered two weeks ago (plus many additional markers like magnesium levels).

Their hand-picked recommended tests also include the Healthy Aging Panel which covers important longevity biomarkers like hsCRP, ApoB, and vitamin D.

They’re also now a reseller for TruDiagnostic’s TruAge biological aging test.

Life Extension, in fact, uses several of their aging panels to provide the blood tests for the Vitality in Aging Longitudinal Study.

The test process is similar to other online testing companies and requires a visit to your nearest Labcorp location where your blood is drawn and analyzed.

While Life Extension doesn’t have the extensive dashboard or back-end algorithmic recommendations that, say, InsideTracker does, they offer free consultations with their wellness specialists after the purchase of any blood test. So if you prefer speaking to a human being over trying to interpret graphs and charts yourself, this may be a good option.

5. Lifeforce

lifeforce longevity blood tests

Based on self-help guru Tony Robbins’s longevity book of the same name, and founded by him and his co-author, Dr. Peter Diamandis, Lifeforce offers only one longevity blood test, but it’s very comprehensive. 

Of the 48 biomarkers measured in the Lifeforce Diagnostic panel, at least 16 are recommended in our overview of the 20 top aging biomarkers (it seems like Tony did his homework!). 

While the test on its own will set you back $549, Lifeforce really pushes its monthly membership, which will give you the first month (including the test) for $349 instead (and it’s then $129 a month after that). Included in the membership is not only the diagnostic, but also a dashboard similar to InsideTracker’s and other InsideTracker competitors’, where you can see and track your results, a 30-minute telehealth session with a board-certified clinician to discuss your results, and re-tests every three months to track changes.

Also included in the membership is a discount on the many supplements and peptides for sale from Lifeforce, and here it’s worth being a bit cautious. While the blood test itself seems insightful for many key longevity drivers, the site does mention that part of the telehealth session involves recommending specific Lifeforce-supplied supplements and peptides based on your panel results. Though many of these, like NMN, magnesium, and vitamin D, can be purchased from other supplement makers, there may be an incentive for Lifeforce clinicians to push their own supplements beyond what clients may need.

That said, the option to re-test every three months to see how different interventions are impacting your health is a potentially useful way to set your health tracking on autopilot.

6. SiPhox Health

(Longevity Advice readers get 10% off using our link)

home blood test kit

SiPhox, a Y-Combinator startup that recently raised $27 million, is a relatively new kid on the block for longevity-related blood testing, but their offering is all the more interesting for that.

Their main panel, an at-home blood test collection kit, tests for 17 different biomarkers, including six from our top aging biomarkers list, measuring things like inflammation and cardiovascular health. Members have access to an optional “Hormone+” panel for $190 which adds seven additional biomarkers.

While you can buy the SiPhox test as a one-off, a-la-carte option for $245, the most interesting aspect of SiPhox’s offering comes with the $16 monthly “Unlimited Membership” option. This membership lets you buy the same test for only $95, and also gives access to extras including the above-mentioned Hormone+ panel, but also a pair of blue light-blocking glasses, access to a $100 Freestyle Libre 3 continuous glucose monitor, and apparently some personalized supplements as well (though which these are is not specified).

Additionally, SiPhox’s backend health-tracking dashboard can apparently integrate with longevity wearables like the Oura Ring, Apple Watch, and Fitbit, potentially making this a great one-stop-shop for spanners wanting to quantify and track how different longevity interventions are impacting their health.

SiPhox is also working on developing an at-home blood test analyzer, similar in concept (but hopefully superior in execution…) to that promised by Theranos, which could bring the equivalent of a blood testing lab into your home for a fraction of the cost. Definitely a company to watch in the future.

7. Thorne

thorne life extension test
  • Cost: $95-$830
  • Number of aging biomarkers tracked: 9-89 depending on package
  • Sample/test type: Any Quest Diagnostics location
  • Privacy and data security: https://www.thorne.com/privacy-policy

Likely familiar to most spanners for their high-quality supplements, Thorne now provides a bevy of health tests and panels. Previously offered by WellnessFX prior to its acquisition, the life extension blood tests now sold by Thorne cover a wide spectrum of longevity-related health categories.

While individual panels will test things like sleep hormones, gut health, and vitamin D levels, Thorne’s flagship blood tests are the $390 Essential Health Panel and the more comprehensive $830 Advanced Health Panel. The only real difference between the two tests is the number of biomarkers they track, with the Essential covering 63 and the Advanced testing for 89, including at least 15 of the markers from our top aging biomarkers list.

A partnership with lab giant Quest Diagnostics means you can find a nearby lab to get your blood drawn in most U.S. cities, and each of their test packages includes AI-based recommendations from Thorne’s in-house dashboard, Onegevity Health Intelligence.

Thorne, like many other longevity companies, has also gotten into the biological age testing game, and their blood-based panel will set you back $95.

Honorable mentions

A couple longevity blood testing companies didn’t quite meet all our criteria (usually because they don’t offer after-test analysis/recommendations, are too expensive, or only offer blood draws in one or two locations) but may still be of interest to you, so I’ve included them here.

Still want to DIY your own longevity blood tests?

If you’re not really interested in the analysis and recommendation value-adds from these companies (and let’s be honest, a lot of them boil down to: eat better, exercise more, sleep better) you can still DIY most of the life-extension blood tests they offer.

Savvy readers will have noted most of the longevity blood testing companies and services covered above send their samples to one of the two major lab companies for processing (LabCorp and Quest Diagnostics) and, guess what? You can get blood samples from your doctor sent to the exact same labs!

So a relatively basic “hack” to emulate the tests given by these companies is to look over their lists of what biomarkers they track, and simply order the same ones from your doctor or from a cheap DIY testing site like:

This does mean you’ll miss out on their cool tracking dashboards (if they have them) and will have to build or find your own spreadsheet to track numbers over time but, depending on your health insurance, this could be a much cheaper option.

How are you currently tracking your health?

Got a cool longevity tracking spreadsheet or dashboard you recommend? Share it in the comments!

8 Comments

    1. Rob

      Mark Hyman is involved with Function Health which tests hundreds of biomarkers through Quest Labs. I used them and liked their customer service which made the process very easy.

      The results were displayed in a user friendly chart. The advice provided with markers that were out of range were OK but very minimal (and similar to Dr Google). You really need a preventative medicine doc to take the data and make it useful.

      I have used lab Corp for years so the Quest results were not as useful due to the difference between the two labs.

      I think its a good product but should offer higher grade analysis, perhaps for a higher fee.

      And this gets to the core issue with all of these. Doctors really only know how to interpret blood tests within very focused areas of metabolic and organ dysfunction.

      If you’re not suffering with a dysfunction that is pathological the advice is a very blunt instrument. A blood marker range that is optimal for an individual would be an awesome thing to have. Perhaps AI will help in the future…

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